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REVIEW: Reliable Horses in Old Log’s Guys and Dolls

The famous “Fugue for Tinhorns” in the Old Log Theatre’s production of Guys and Dolls. Pictured: Jordan Oxborough, Aaron Booth, and Austin Stole. Photo courtesy of the Old Log Theatre.

You won’t find any surprises in the Old Log Theatre’s new production of Guys and Dolls, but that’s not why you go to see a canonical show like this. You go for the great music, a trip through warmly familiar jokes, and to enjoy memories like old friends. Or you go for a first date with theatre that’s guaranteed to please.

There’s a lot to like in this show. Director Kent Knutson has assembled a band of fresh-faced young actors to fill the cast of gamblers, molls, mobsters, and dolls, with some snappy dancing and pleasant vocals. The production gets off to a good start with the famous “Fugue for Tinhorns”, sung with pleasant vigor by Jordan Oxborough, Aaron Booth, and Austin Stole. From there, it’s off to the races, nightclubs, and gambling dens.

The four main principals are well-cast, from the silky smooth bass tones of Eric Sargent as Sky Masterson to Kym Chambers Otto’s ever-suffering Adelaide. Charlie Clark’s Nathan Detroit is perhaps a bit greasier than normal as he squirms out of situation after situation, but that’s not a bad thing. Grace Chermak brings a more human and conflicted Sarah Brown to the Salvation Army table. There are no surprises, except how quickly the time passes with the excellent score and energetic performances.


Guys and Dolls plays through June 16 at the Old Log Theatre in Excelsior, MN.

Basil Considine
Basil Considine is the Performing Arts Editor and Senior Classical Music and Drama Critic at the Twin Cities Arts Reader. He was previously the Resident Classical Music and Drama Critic at the Twin Cities Daily Planet and remains an occasional contributing writer for The Boston Musical Intelligencer and The Chattanoogan. He holds a PhD in Music and Drama from Boston University, an MTS in Sacred Music from the BU School of Theology, and a BA in Music and Theatre from the University of San Diego. Basil was named one of Musical America's 30 Professionals of the Year in 2017.
http://basilconsidine.org
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